Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Nursing Diagnosis and Interventions for Menstruation Disorders - Dysmenorrhea

Nursing Care Plan for DysmenorrheaNursing Diagnosis for Dysmenorrhea

Dysmenorrhea is defined as a condition of severe uterine pain during menstruation. All women experience an irregular period once in awhile during their child bearing years. Some women may experience periodic pains during or prior to, or after menstrual periods in the lower abdomen as resulting of over production of certain hormones in the prostaglandins family.

Primary dysmenorrhea is due to disordered or too much prostaglandin production through the secretory endometrium of the uterus within the absence of a structural lesion.

Dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation) can also include symptoms such as headache, fatigue, bloating, and even nausea, vomiting, and/or diarrhea.

Dysmenorrhea can be treated with a variety of drugs, including pain relievers, sedatives, antispasmodics, prostaglandin inhibitors, and oral contraceptives.


Nursing Diagnosis and Interventions for Menstruation Disorders - Dysmenorrhea
  1. Acute Pain related to increased uterine contractility, hypersensitivity
  2. Imbalanced Nutrition Less Than Body Requirements related to the nausea, vomiting.
  3. Ineffective individual coping related to emotional excess.
Nursing Interventions for Dysmenorrhea

1. Acute Pain related to increased uterine contractility, hypersensitivity.

Goal: pain reduced client

Nursing Interventions:
1. Warm the abdomen.
Rational: may cause vasodilation and reduce the spasmodic contractions of the uterus.

2. Massage the abdominal area that feels pain.
Rational: reduce pain due to the stimulus of therapeutic touch.

3. Perform light exercise
Rational: it can improve blood flow to the uterus and muscle tone.

4. Perform relaxation techniques.
Rational: reduce the pressure to get relaxed.

5. Give the natural diuresis (vitamin) sleep and rest.
Rational: reduce congestion.

2. Ineffective individual coping related to emotional excess.

Nursing Interventions:
1. Assess client's understanding of her illness.
Rational: maternal anxiety of the pain will be greatly influenced by knowledge.

2. Determine the additional stress that accompanies it.
Rational: stress can impair the autonomic nervous response, so it is feared to increase the pain.

3. Provide an opportunity to discuss how the pain.

4. Help clients identify coping skills during the period covered.
Rational: the use of behavior management techniques can help clients adapt to the pain they experienced.

5. Give the period of sleep or rest.
Rational: the pain and fatigue due to spending a lot of body fluids tends to be a problem that must mean a lot of the body tends to be significant problems that must be addressed immediately.

6. Push the skills of stress, such as relaxation techniques, visualization, guidance, imagination and deep breathing exercises.
Rational: it can reduce pain and distract the client to pain.

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